Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11455/37932
標題: Effects of agriculture on the abundance and community structure of epilithic algae in mountain streams of subtropical Taiwan
作者: Yu, S.F.
林幸助
Lin, H.J.
關鍵字: Achnanthidium;Current velocity;Diatoms;Grazer density;NO(2)+NO(3);Wuling;land-use;water-quality;headwater streams;benthic algae;laboratory;streams;substrate relief;periphyton;phosphorus;nutrient;nitrogen
Project: Botanical Studies
期刊/報告no:: Botanical Studies, Volume 50, Issue 1, Page(s) 73-87.
摘要: 
This study aimed to characterize the abundance and community structure of epilithic algae and to examine the effects of intensive agriculture in mountain streams of the Wuling area. There were significant seasonal variations in epilithic algal biomass, with higher values in spring and winter and lower values in summer and fall. Effects of agriculture on the subtropical streams of the Wuling area were significant and varied with the extent of agriculture in the catchment. The biomass was significantly higher in Yousheng Stream with a larger area of agriculture than in other streams. Diatoms were the most abundant species, contributing over 85% to the total cell number. Most of these were pennatae diatoms, of which the genus Achnanthidium was the most abundant in the area. However, the communities showed clear seasonal and spatial changes. BIOENV analysis suggested that the combination of water temperature, conductivity, NO(2)+NO(3) and SiO(2) concentrations and current velocity comprised the major factors explaining seasonal changes in the community, while the combination of NO(2)+NO(3) and SiO(2) concentration and grazer density comprised the major factors affecting spatial changes. Changes in abundance and community structure of epilithic algae can be used to monitor the effects of agriculture in tropical/subtropical mountain streams.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11455/37932
ISSN: 1817-406X
Appears in Collections:生命科學系所

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