Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11455/45816
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChou, W.C.en_US
dc.contributor.author林昭遠zh_TW
dc.contributor.authorLin, W.T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, C.Y.en_US
dc.date2009zh_TW
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-06T08:15:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-06T08:15:39Z-
dc.identifier.issn0167-6369zh_TW
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11455/45816-
dc.description.abstractThe catastrophic earthquake, 7.3 on the Richter scale, occurred on September 21, 1999 in Central Taiwan. Much of standing vegetation on slopes was eliminated and massive, scattered landslides were induced at the Jou-Jou Mountain area of the Wu-Chi basin in Nantou County. We evaluated three methods for assessing landslide hazard and vegetation recovery conditions. (1) Self-organizing map (SOM) neural network coupled with fuzzy technique was used to quickly extract the landslide. (2) The NDVI-based vegetation recovery index derived from multi-temporal SPOT satellite images was used to evaluate vegetation recovery rate in the denudation sites. (3) The spatial distribution index (SDI) based on land-cover topographic location was employed to analyze vegetation recovery patterns, including the invading, surviving and mixed patterns at the Jou-Jou Mountain area. On September 27, 1999, there were 849.20 ha of landslide area extracted using the self-organizing map and fuzzy technique combined model. After six years of natural vegetation succession, the landslide has gradually restored, and vegetation recovery rate reached up to 86%. On-site observation shows that many native pioneer plants have invaded onto the denudation sites even if disturbed by several typhoons. Two native surviving plants, Arundo formosana Hack and Pinus taiwanensis Hayata, play a vital role in natural vegetation succession in this area, especially for the sites on ridgeline and steep slopes.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USzh_TW
dc.relationEnvironmental Monitoring and Assessmenten_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEnvironmental Monitoring and Assessment, Volume 152, Issue 1-4, Page(s) 245-257.en_US
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-008-0312-8en_US
dc.subjectLandslide hazard assessmenten_US
dc.subjectVegetation recovery pattern analysisen_US
dc.subjectSelf-organizing map (SOM)en_US
dc.subjectFuzzy techniqueen_US
dc.subjectremotely-sensed dataen_US
dc.subjecthazarden_US
dc.subjectgisen_US
dc.subjectdynamicsen_US
dc.subjectclassificationen_US
dc.subjecteuropeen_US
dc.subjectndvien_US
dc.titleVegetation recovery patterns assessment at landslides caused by catastrophic earthquake: A case study in central Taiwanen_US
dc.typeJournal Articlezh_TW
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10661-008-0312-8zh_TW
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.languageiso639-1en_US-
item.fulltextno fulltext-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairetypeJournal Article-
Appears in Collections:水土保持學系
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