Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11455/6697
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dc.contributor.advisor董崇選zh_TW
dc.contributor.advisorChung-Hsuan Tungen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsai, Gung-Jien_US
dc.contributor.author蔡恭吉zh_TW
dc.date2000zh_TW
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-06T06:38:47Z-
dc.date.available2014-06-06T06:38:47Z-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11455/6697-
dc.description.abstractThe ode has never been a fixed and distinct form; it is nearly impossible to formulate a perfect and faultless definition for it. Each writer may have a very personal impression and understanding of this poetic genre. There are numerous inconsistencies existing in both theory and practice concerning its form. The classical odes are usually written for public purposes; the Romantic odes for private and personal expression. In the “Immortality Ode,” Wordsworth feels that his vision has lost the glory with which it shone when he was young. He discerns grounds for a faith in immortality and finds in his mature outlook a compensation for the loss of his juvenile vision. This ode examines the whole story of human life as an exile from an earlier and more perfect state. It is not merely the record of one poet's vision, but of the necessary process of human existence. “Dejection: An Ode” dramatizes Coleridge's fluctuating mood as he witnesses the shift of light and shade and feels the change of atmosphere before the coming of a storm. It works through the interplay of past and present, and of different scenes and personal reflections. The poet dreads that private unhappiness has cost him his poetic imagination. Shelley typifies the balanced Romantic interest in nature and dreams on one hand and in the social and political world on the other. As we see in the “Ode to the West Wind,” Shelley tries to convey an optimistic message to mankind. It deals simultaneously with the function of poetry in human society and with the value of the poet's life burdened with sufferings and frustrations. Keats's unique and memorable poetic diction, his intense and sensuous imagery, and his effective use of tension, ambiguity, and paradox, etc., are all found in his odes. His odes are poems of imaginative meditation, exploring the poet's reactions to intense contemplation of a work of art (a Grecian urn), a living creature (a nightingale), a mythical goddess (Psyche), a psychological condition (melancholy), and a season (autumn). This thesis focuses mainly on the odes of the Romantic period. My concentration and object is to present the evolution and development of this specific genre and to deal with the poetic expressions of certain famous examples.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe ode has never been a fixed and distinct form; it is nearly impossible to formulate a perfect and faultless definition for it. Each writer may have a very personal impression and understanding of this poetic genre. There are numerous inconsistencies existing in both theory and practice concerning its form. The classical odes are usually written for public purposes; the Romantic odes for private and personal expression. In the “Immortality Ode,” Wordsworth feels that his vision has lost the glory with which it shone when he was young. He discerns grounds for a faith in immortality and finds in his mature outlook a compensation for the loss of his juvenile vision. This ode examines the whole story of human life as an exile from an earlier and more perfect state. It is not merely the record of one poet's vision, but of the necessary process of human existence. “Dejection: An Ode” dramatizes Coleridge's fluctuating mood as he witnesses the shift of light and shade and feels the change of atmosphere before the coming of a storm. It works through the interplay of past and present, and of different scenes and personal reflections. The poet dreads that private unhappiness has cost him his poetic imagination. Shelley typifies the balanced Romantic interest in nature and dreams on one hand and in the social and political world on the other. As we see in the “Ode to the West Wind,” Shelley tries to convey an optimistic message to mankind. It deals simultaneously with the function of poetry in human society and with the value of the poet's life burdened with sufferings and frustrations. Keats's unique and memorable poetic diction, his intense and sensuous imagery, and his effective use of tension, ambiguity, and paradox, etc., are all found in his odes. His odes are poems of imaginative meditation, exploring the poet's reactions to intense contemplation of a work of art (a Grecian urn), a living creature (a nightingale), a mythical goddess (Psyche), a psychological condition (melancholy), and a season (autumn). This thesis focuses mainly on the odes of the Romantic period. My concentration and object is to present the evolution and development of this specific genre and to deal with the poetic expressions of certain famous examples.zh_TW
dc.description.tableofcontentsCONTENTS Acknowledgements ix Abstract x Chapter I: Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1. Definitions and Characteristics of the Ode 2. Affinities of the Ode to Other Modes a. The Lyric b. The Song and the Ode c. The Hymn and the Ode 3. Classical Prototypes a. The Odes of Pindar b. The Odes of Horace c. Comparison 4. English Odes before the Romantic Period a. Pindaric Odes b. Horatian Odes c. Cowleyan or Irregular Odes 5. The Scope and Approaches of This Thesis Chapter II: Wordsworth's Immortality Ode and Coleridge's Dejection Ode . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1. Form, Structure, and Content a. Wordsworth's Immortality Ode b. Coleridge's “Dejection: An Ode” 2. Expression and Thought a. Power and Imagination b. Nature and Life c. Memory and Immortality d. Poetic- and Self-Maturity Chapter III: Shelley's Odes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 1. Form, Structure, and Content a. “Hymn to Intellectual Beauty” b. “Ode to the West Wind” c. “To a Skylark” 2. Expression and Thought a. Symbolic Imagination b. Unseen Power c. The Poet as a Seer Chapter IV: Keats's Odes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 1. Form, Structure, and Content a. “Ode to Psyche” b. “Ode on Melancholy” c. “Ode on a Grecian Urn” d. “Ode to a Nightingale” e. “Ode on Indolence” f. “To Autumn” 2. Expression and Thought a. Imagination and Reality b. Negative Capability c. Beauty and Truth d. Sensuousness and Synaesthesia Chapter V: Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 1. From Classic to Romantic Odes a. The Romantic Qualities and the Romantic Odes b. The Romantic Imagination and the Prophetic Strain 2. English Odes after the Romantic Period a. The Victorian Age b. The Twentieth Century 3. Afterword Appendix: A Selected List of Odes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . .zh_TW
dc.language.isoen_USzh_TW
dc.publisher外國語文學系zh_TW
dc.subjectRomantic Perioden_US
dc.subject浪漫時期zh_TW
dc.subjectOdesen_US
dc.subjectWordsworthen_US
dc.subjectColeridgeen_US
dc.subjectShelleyen_US
dc.subjectKeatsen_US
dc.subject頌歌zh_TW
dc.subject華滋華斯zh_TW
dc.subject柯律芝zh_TW
dc.subject雪利zh_TW
dc.subject濟慈zh_TW
dc.titleA Study of English Romantic Odesen_US
dc.title英國浪漫時期頌歌之研究zh_TW
dc.typeThesis and Dissertationzh_TW
item.languageiso639-1en_US-
item.openairetypeThesis and Dissertation-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextno fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
Appears in Collections:外國語文學系所
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